Take a Stand for the Girl Who Stood Up: Nominate Malala for the Nobel Peace Prize

by
Malala Yousufzai
EducationGirlsGood CausesHuman RightsWomen's Rights 12 Comments

You should know Bonnie S. Lloyd, a woman from Rochester, NY who is doing something extraordinary for a remarkable young girl. She is standing with Malala Yousafzai, the 15 year old girl who was shot in the head by a Taliban assailant last month for the “crime” of going to school, by petitioning Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton & Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to nominate Malala for a Nobel Peace Prize.

Bonnie’s petition follows those already started in Canada, Germany, England and France that have the same goal. She wrote it so her country, the United States of America, could show its support of this historic movement, Malala and girls everywhere.

To that end, Bonnie is asking citizens of the United States to stand with her by signing her Change.org petition. At the time this posted, the petition already had over 173,000 supporters and needed just over 26,000 more.

Women You Should Know® is standing with Bonnie and Malala and you can too. Bonnie’s petition is below. To sign it, simply click here.


Take a Stand for the Girl Who Stood Up: Nominate Malala for the Nobel Peace Prize

Petitioned by Bonnie S. Lloyd

All Malala wants to do is go to school. She almost died for it.

On October 9, 2012, Malala Yousafzai was gunned down for the “crime” of going to school. Today the world stands with this remarkable girl, a girl so brave she stood up to the Taliban, a group so evil they stalk and murder innocent children for the “sin” of seeking education.

Tarek Fatah of Canada started a petition to nominate Malala for the Nobel Peace Prize; petitions from Germany, England and France have swiftly followed. I want my country, the United States of America, to join in this historic moment of empowerment for girls and women everywhere.

As an educator and board member of a non-profit dedicated to providing educational opportunity to children in South Sudan, I know first-hand the value of education for all children. I stand with Malala in her passion; I ask the citizens of the United States to stand with her too.

These are bold times for girls and women. Girls are going to school in places where it was unthinkable a generation ago. Women fill the jobs of doctor, lawyer, and politician. Travesties of justice – rape, battering, “honor” killings, sex slavery, servitude, genital mutilation – are no longer in the closet. The world knows the truth now.

Yet there is much to do, as Malala’s wounds attest. The hopes and dreams of girls throughout the world are no longer hidden – silent, muffled, afraid. Civilization is at the crossroads of opportunity to accept this call to action.

This is why I am asking Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to nominate Malala Yousafzai for a Nobel Peace Prize.

By nominating Malala Yousafzai, these global leaders will send a clear message: We stand with Malala and with girls everywhere in their fight for the right to equal opportunity through education.

  • Elisa

    I am in awe of Ms. Yousafzai’s bravery. An education should be a basic, human right.

  • Truth-Teller

    As I have no other means of contacting you I’ll post this here instead.
    You have that prominent petition claiming that Malala was attacked merely for wanting an education. But that is emphatically 100% untrue, it is merely the official propaganda. In reality the Taliban made clear that she was attacked for advocating secularism, that is opposing genuine (ie. non-secular) Islam. They were thus acting in accordance with the various commands from Allah in the quran to kill those who oppose Islam. Every year, thousands of others are likewise killed or injured for opposing Islam, just they are not cute enough for their deaths to be rated as media events. We should put an end to all this Jihad Denial, of a jihad which very much is ongoing unlike any holocausts that may have occured long ago.

    • Dejuisti

      Do you have any proof of this being 100% untrue?

      • Truth-Teller

        You can see in all the original reports of the incident that they mention that the Taliban themselves said that that was the reason why they carried out the attack, not because of her education campaigning. The web is quite good at preserving a record of such reports so I guess you can still read them today.
        It is of course also true that Malala was strongly campaigning for education for girls, in the context of a campaign of intimidation and of destruction of schools. Sometimes, often, the media doesn’t let the facts get in the way of a “good” story. Also I found it rather add that there was a documentary about her which videoed their fleeing from Mingora and then returning (to find the garden had become “a jangel” (in their cute pronunciation!) . I find it strange that those personal events were being filmed by media, as if her case had somehow already been selected as a “reality show” – for propaganda purposes?

  • Madison

    What’s important to take from this is that a group of men shot a young girl trying to kill her. Whether it was her standing up for education, or advocating secularism, there is NO circumstance that makes this ok. If it takes the image and story of this young girl to wake up the rest of the world to what life is like for women and girls in other parts of the world, then so be it. Propaganda, not propaganda, who really cares.

    • Truth-Teller

      “Propaganda, not propaganda, who really cares.”
      So you don’t care that people are deceived by the media and you don’t care what the truth is.
      Well, I for one do not consider these attitudes at all commendable.
      The way to solve problems is by first identifying the reality. And speaking honestly. To do otherwise is folly.

  • Truth-Teller

    “what life is like for women and girls in other parts of the world,”
    But there is exactly the same jihadist persecution of men and boys as well, they just don’t qualify for the same level of human rights sympathy in certain femi-do-gooder’s eyes. Woman beaten up – how atrocious. Man beaten up – oh well, a man, so that’s just life isn’t it.

    • Matt T

      I’m sorry… did you just say “femi-do-gooder”? It’s actually laughable that you would attempt to demonize any woman who speaks out against the HUMAN atrocity that was committed against Malala as some sort of “FemiNazi” with a skewed, singular perspective agenda. I guess I’m fortunate to know LOTS of women who would be equally enraged had an innocent boy, man or woman been shot in the head by a terrorist.

      • Truth-Teller

        Reply to Matt T: No I did not “attempt to demonize” any woman.
        I merely used the words “femi-do-gooder” – and what has that got to do with any demons, or even being negative about them in any way?

        “I guess I’m fortunate to know LOTS of women who would be equally enraged had an innocent boy, man or woman been shot in the head by a terrorist.”

        So what? What’s new there? My point was that here someone is preoccupied (as so often) with Malala being female, and being happy to have Malala’s case mischaracterised as something to do with gender when it was nothing of the sort. That was the whole point of my raising the matter.

  • Truth-Teller

    “It’s actually laughable that you would attempt to demonize any woman who speaks out against the HUMAN atrocity that was committed against Malala”

    On the contrary the person in question (“Madison”, is that a female name?) explicitly did not use the word “HUMAN” (your caps) but instead explicitly used the words: “what life is like for women and girls in other parts of the world,”. And that was the WHOLE POINT of my reply. (and yet you managed to completely reverse your perception of it).

    You appear to have a problem of Attitude First, Facts Nowhere, a common problem in certain circles. I suggest you spend less time knee-jerk-writing and more time reflecting. Cheers..

  • Dejuitsi

    @Truth-Teller I’m still waiting for a source proving the idea that being a female and wanting to attend school to get an education played no role in her being a target — and that it is “emphatically 100% untrue.”

    And please don’t cite any delayed, qualified public relations statements from a Taliban spokeperson attempting to resculpt the situation or massage previous statements.
    There’s no way their statements could be considered “propaganda,” right?

    The Taliban is known for not taking kindly to individuals speaking out against them in any manner (not just about religious concepts). There is much that probably falls under the concept of what they feel is unacceptable. Criticizing them for not allowing her and her female counterparts to go to school would definitely fall under that “unacceptable” umbrella.

    Read Malala’s blog. She has a central focus, that being wanting an education and the constant limitations the Taliban put on her ability (along with other neighborhood girls) to go to school. This included demolishing the schools.

    While speaking out about wanting an education may not be the entire reason for the barbaric attack by the Taliban, it is hard to make a case that it did not play a role. They may have interpreted her various criticisms through a generic prism of intollerance and barbarism that was distilled down to a simple disdain for her, ignoring her actual message. But it is naive to not aknowledge that her constant drumbeat for education was not part of the equation.

  • Truth-Teller

    @Truth-Teller I’m still waiting for a source proving the idea that being a female and wanting to attend school to get an education played no role in her being a target — and that it is “emphatically 100% untrue.”

    You seem to fail to understand that I do not have any duty/obligation here to do your homework for you. I read the numerous media reports which said one thing in the headline (girl’s education) and the honest statement from Taliban further down. I just came here to point out the error, and you can chase up the reports youself if you really insist on disbelieving me. If you want to persist in treating me as some sort of deceiver, then good riddance. I have other things to get on with (with less negative people) than reply to all the longwinded disrespect being shown here. I haven’t read the rest of your essay there. Bye.

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