Get Teal’d! September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

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Ovarian Cancer Statistic
HealthMedicineWomanhood 1 Comment

IN 2012, MORE THAN 22,000 WOMEN WILL BE NEWLY DIAGNOSED WITH OVARIAN CANCER. OVARIAN CANCER RANKS 5TH IN CANCER DEATHS AMONG WOMEN.

Teal is the color of ovarian cancer awareness and by asking people to display it during the month of September, the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition wants to increase women’s understanding about this deadly disease. Since there is no screening test, it is vital that every woman recognize the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer as early detection saves lives.

Last September, we met Nancy Ramondo, a two time ovarian cancer survivor. She has proven herself to be a golden gloves champion in the fight against this deadly disease and she is a Woman You Should Know. We encourage you to read Nancy’s inspirational story, told candidly in her own words, here.

About Ovarian Cancer

Teal RibbonOvarian cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancerous) cells are found in the tissues of the ovary. An ovary is one of two small reproductive organs – about the size of an almond or slightly larger – located on each side of the uterus that produce female hormones and eggs. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from all gynecologic cancers and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates that about 22,280 American women will be diagnosed this year and 15,500 will die of the disease.

Because each woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer has a different profile, it is impossible to give a general prognosis. If diagnosed and treated early when the cancer is confined to the ovary, the five-year survival rate is nearly 93 percent. Unfortunately, ovarian cancer symptoms are non-specific and there is no effective screening test for the disease. As a result, only 20 percent of all ovarian cancer cases are caught at an early stage. Most women are diagnosed at advanced stages, and fewer than 50 percent live longer than five years after diagnosis.

To find out more about ovarian cancer – signs & symptoms, risk factors, prevention – visit WhyTeal?

  • Thia

    Thank you for sharing this most important information. I think breast cancer has raised so much awareness that the other female cancers have been less spoken about overall.

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