Four Dudes, Two Different Brands, One Really Bad Message About How To Market To Men

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In this episode of “How Many More Ways Can Women Be Objectified,” we present two different, but equally rude marketing campaigns created by men to sell crap to other men. What they share in common is their shameless reliance on sexualizing and objectifying women to peddle said crap, while debasing men in the process. Why are we talking about this, you ask? Because it’s important to speak out and up when you see things that are simply not ok.

The first is a mind numbing collaboration between designers Constantin Bolimond, out of Moscow, and Maksim Ali, out of New York. These two creative geniuses came up with the packaging for a product called Titses Milk… that’s right… we said Titses Milk, a line of milk chocolate bars that are covered with perky, 3-D breast-shaped nuggets.

Some of the finer details the fellas came up with for their age-restricted (“18+”) packaging include size labels and an enjoyment illustration. Yep, each package is flagged with an S through XL, presumably so the chocolate lover can choose his bar based on his personal “size preference.” And in case he doesn’t know how to eat chocolate there’s also a handy graphic that shows him how to fondle and twist like a pro.

Now for the pièce de résistance… their creative rationale behind the packaging, “The aim of the project Titses milk is to attract mens’ attention to the product that is so loved by women, but is often overlooked by a strong half of the population.” WHAT?!?!

Full disclosure: We were not able to verify if this is real product packaging or just spec work, but does it really matter?




Next up is the handy work of Canadian designers Hardip Manku and Zoum. Of their Plain Jane Homme ready to wear collection for men they say it, “reflects someone with a casanova of a personality, the true Plain Jane zeitgeist knows the essential nature of courting his lady luck, and looking good while doing it.” They drone on, “Plain Jane was created as homage to the untouchable girl next door. The girl every guy wants and every girl wants to be.”

How did they achieve such a lofty goal? By emblazoning every article of clothing they make with what they call a “classic logo,” which is, in reality, a nude woman, standing spread eagle in stilettos with her underwear pushed down to her knees. Cause we all know that the best way for a guy to make a great first impression is to show up with a mudflap girl on his shirt, right? WHAT?!?!


classic logo