clara_panel

Casualty of Marriage: The Tragedy Of Clara Immerwahr, Germany’s First Doctor Of Chemistry

January 18, 2017 by

The lady researcher Is always fumbling about, searching and probing around her, For problems to fathom; She studies and parlays and memorizes and discusses but can find no satisfaction. She searches out famous scholars, Discusses philosophical problems, Studies creation and the course of the stars. She even dares to approach ... [Read More]

panel3 copy (6)

Maestro Of Trajectories: The Fascinating Tale Of Katherine Johnson’s Orbital Mathematics

January 12, 2017 by

Before NASA, there was NACA, an oddball collection of aeronautics nerds using black box data and wind tunnel analysis to figure out as much as they could about the science of flight. Calculations, done almost entirely by hand, were the coursing lifeblood of the organization. Those calculations ... [Read More]

rubinpanel1

Legacy, Suspended: Vera Rubin And The Ongoing Saga Of Dark Matter

January 4, 2017 by

Vera Rubin died last week, and for a brief moment the gaze of the Internet swung her way to notice her remarkable life and work, to say a number of things about them of which perhaps half were true, and then moved back to its usual stalking grounds. That instant of online recognition left a wake of bubbling misconceptions it ... [Read More]

featurehappy-copy

The Enemy is Ignorance: Marine Biologist Sylvia Earle Speaks for the Oceans

December 28, 2016 by

One of the most consistently frustrating things about humanity is our blithe willingness to allow all manner of industrially organized brutality so long as the end result is something chemically interesting sliding momentarily across the taste receptors of our tongues. On land, the result is the often grizzly but at least regulated horror ... [Read More]

lead_panel_dale

Sex, Cards, and Calculus: A Day with Badass Mathematician Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749)

December 21, 2016 by

In popular mythology, the 1687 publication of Newton’s Principia was the culminating moment when one human told the world how the universe works, performed his century’s equivalent of the mic drop, and then received the adulation that was his due. Of course, it worked nothing like that, ... [Read More]

gilbrethfeaturedimage

Lillian Moller Gilbreth “The First Lady Of Engineering” And The Founding Of Industrial Psychology

December 14, 2016 by

Humans have been building structures out of ceramic brick for five thousand years, and for four thousand nine hundred of those years the method had hardly changed: throw a bunch of bricks at the foot of a bricklayer and then watch as he bends over, picks one up, places it, and then proceeds to do ... [Read More]

women_science_wednesdays

Announcing ‘Women In Science Wednesday’ An Exclusive New Series Celebrating Women Scientists

December 13, 2016 by

Women You Should Know is incredibly excited to announce - Women In Science Wednesday - a new collaboration with Dale DeBakcsy, a math and science teacher, dad of two daughters, and the man behind the outrageously entertaining series ... [Read More]

NAVIGATE