Hydrogen Rules: Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin (1900-1979) and the Composition of Stars

March 8, 2017 by

“You are young, and wrong. You must retract.” When fresh-faced zeal confronts experience, it usually loses. Scientists who think they’ve solved everything on day one usually find that they’ve merely wandered into a seductive semblance of a solution, the first of many in the years to come, ... [Read More]

The Strangers Within: Biologist Lynn Margulis and the Rebirth of Endosymbiosis

March 5, 2017 by

In terms of cell count, ninety percent of you isn't you at all. Bacteria, though by mass they only make up about two percent of a human being, account for nine out of every ten cells inside you. Some of them are beneficial, like the bacteria in your digestive system that help break down carbohydrates. Others, less so, like the mouth bacteria ... [Read More]

The Chemistry of Beauty: Hazel Bishop, Inventor Of First Marketable Indelible Lipstick

January 25, 2017 by

Remember a while ago when I said that botanists were the most under-respected members of the scientific community? Well, that's true until you consider a branch of science so underappreciated that many disdainfully refuse to even consider its practitioners as ... [Read More]

Legacy, Suspended: Vera Rubin And The Ongoing Saga Of Dark Matter

January 4, 2017 by

Vera Rubin died last week, and for a brief moment the gaze of the Internet swung her way to notice her remarkable life and work, to say a number of things about them of which perhaps half were true, and then moved back to its usual stalking grounds. That instant of online recognition left a wake of bubbling misconceptions it ... [Read More]

The Enemy is Ignorance: Marine Biologist Sylvia Earle Speaks for the Oceans

December 28, 2016 by

One of the most consistently frustrating things about humanity is our blithe willingness to allow all manner of industrially organized brutality so long as the end result is something chemically interesting sliding momentarily across the taste receptors of our tongues. On land, the result is the often grizzly but at least regulated horror ... [Read More]

Sex, Cards, and Calculus: A Day with Badass Mathematician Émilie du Châtelet (1706-1749)

December 21, 2016 by

In popular mythology, the 1687 publication of Newton’s Principia was the culminating moment when one human told the world how the universe works, performed his century’s equivalent of the mic drop, and then received the adulation that was his due. Of course, it worked nothing like that, ... [Read More]

Lillian Moller Gilbreth “The First Lady Of Engineering” And The Founding Of Industrial Psychology

December 14, 2016 by

Humans have been building structures out of ceramic brick for five thousand years, and for four thousand nine hundred of those years the method had hardly changed: throw a bunch of bricks at the foot of a bricklayer and then watch as he bends over, picks one up, places it, and then proceeds to do ... [Read More]

Announcing ‘Women In Science Wednesday’ An Exclusive New Series Celebrating Women Scientists

December 13, 2016 by

Women You Should Know is incredibly excited to announce - Women In Science Wednesday - a new collaboration with Dale DeBakcsy, a math and science teacher, dad of two daughters, and the man behind the outrageously entertaining series ... [Read More]

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